Combat

When it comes to combat, the game proceeds in rounds.

Start of the combat

As soon as a conflict arises, time is frozen, and the group decides the order in which the participants of the combat will act.

To do this, each participant rolls on a D6, and adds the speed value. The participant with the highest score starts the combat, all others follow in the order of their scores.

If two participants have the same result, the Quickness value decides first, and if this is also identical, the Deftness value.

All participants of the combat have no actions available at the beginning of the combat. Only when they receive the priority for the first time do their actions refresh.

Sequence of rounds

The combat is divided into combat rounds. In each combat round, each participant gets priority once, i.e. it is his turn and he can determine which actions he will perform.

If the last participant has acted, the next combat round begins with the first participant.

Actor and actions

If it is a participant's turn, he has the priority, he is the actor at this moment.

At the beginning of the turn, the actions of the participant refresh. The number of the player's actions is taken from the player's lineage. Thus, a human has 2 actions available in combat. The actions per round can be expanded by templates.

"Refresh" therefore means that all actions are available again. If the participant has previously used up actions, for example by actions in previous combat rounds, he resets his available actions to the maximum.

Once the actions are refreshed, the participant can act in combat. To do this, he performs actions one after another, each action taking a certain number of actions. Actions can be, among others, the following:

  • To attack with a weapon
  • Parry with a weapon or object.
  • Reload a weapon
  • Use an object
  • evade a melee attack.
  • Kneel or lay on the ground.
  • Walk Quickness Meters (performing another action without consuming an action, but each roll is reduced by 2).
  • Run Quickness * 2 meters.
  • Crawl Quickness / 2 meters.

Actions should not be performed together, but always one after the other, as there are possible reactions.

Reactions

If an actor acts in combat, all participants who directly perceive the actor can react to this action.

To be able to react to an action, the following conditions must be met:

  • The reacting participant must directly perceive the actor, i.e. hear, see, or otherwise become aware of his action.
  • The reacting participant still has unused actions.

The reaction is executed immediately after the actor's action, but takes place practically simultaneously. There can only ever be one reaction by a participant to an action. However, any number of participants can react to the actor when they perceive its action.

Each reaction reduces the available actions of the reacting participant by one.

Actions through bonus dice

Bonus and destiny dice can be used in combat to gain or steal actions.

To gain an additional action, a bonus die can be subtracted. The additional action is available immediately, including for a reaction.

If a destiny die is spent, an action can be stolen from an opponent. This action is no longer available to the opponent in his current (or next, if it is not his turn) turn. The participant who spent the destiny dice has the action immediately available, even as a reaction.

Spending dice for actions does not itself take an action.

Sequence of an attack

Attacks with weapons are handled exactly the same in melee and ranged combat. The only difference is that attacks with melee weapons are rolled on the Hand to Hand combat skill, attacks with firearms are rolled on the Shooting skill, and attacks with throwing weapons are rolled on the Throwing skill.

The hit roll and cover

To make an attack, a roll of a certain number of dice is made. The minimum roll of this die is equal to the minimum roll of the character.

The number of dice initially corresponds to the character's respective skill value (shooting, hand to hand combat, throwing).

Depending on the cover, a certain number of dice are removed from this roll:

  • Light cover: -1 die
  • Half cover: -2 dice
  • Almost complete cover: -3 dice

Each success causes a hit to the target of the attack. How the target can prevent damage is described under hit.

The hit roll can also be changed by other circumstances. Different fire modes and firing at the wrong distance may cause the available dice to change.

Bonus dice: Fire modes

Modern weapons usually have different firing modes. If fire modes are specified for the weapon, the following rule can be used for the weapon.

It is assumed that the weapon is in semi-automatic or burst mode for a normal hit roll. In this mode, the weapon fires the specified number of rounds per action. For weapons with only fully automatic fire mode, this is assumed to be the default.

When firing in a mode other than the default mode, the number of shots and the accuracy of the weapon changes:

  • Single shot mode: +1 die
  • Semi-automatic mode: +2 dice
  • Full-auto: +4 dice, all the character's unspent actions must be used up for shots with this weapon, after which the combat round ends for him. No actions can be saved for reactions.
Minus die: Hit rolls at wrong distance.

Each weapon has a specified distance at which it is effective. If the target's distance differs from that specified on the weapon, there is a penalty to the hit dice.

If the real shooting distance is less than the specified distance of the weapon, the attack is performed normally.

If the distance is increased up to the double of the weapon, the hit dice of the hit roll are reduced by 2.

If the target's distance is more than twice the weapon's range away, it is not possible to shoot or attack at the target.

Hit and penetration

Any success of the hit roll is a hit on the target of the attack. Other circumstances can also cause hits, for example a grenade can cause "3 hits with 2 wounds each".

If a character takes hits, they are reduced by the target's protection value. The protection is reduced by the penetration of the attacker's weapon.

Any hit not prevented by the protection value becomes as many wounds as the weapon or effect specifies.

Bonus wounds

If bonus wounds are specified with the weapon, they are caused directly as soon as one of the weapon's regular hits is converted into a wound. Thus, they are added to the sum of the wounds, and do not represent the wounds per hit.

Wounds

A wound is added directly to the wounds taken. It can only be prevented if a template, equipment or other explicitly contains a rule that modifies wounds.

Weaponless melee

If the character attacks without a weapon, the player rolls hit dice equal to his Hand to hand combat value. The minimum roll is equal to the character's minimum roll, which is usually 5+.

If the character's Strength value is higher than 2, the successful attack causes 1 bonus wound.

If the character's Quickness value is higher than 2, the character adds one die to the roll.

The penetration of an unarmed melee attack is 0, and the range is 1 meter.

Evasion

The attacked character can dodge a melee attack as a reaction. This requires that the attacked character has an action available and can perceive the attacker. Thus, an attack from behind cannot be dodged.

To dodge an attack, the character rolls a die to his value in Evasion on his normal minimum roll. The character has completely dodged the attack if the roll is successful.

Throwing objects

If an object, such as a grenade, is thrown at a target, the character throws to its value in Throwing. The minimum roll is equal to the character's minimum roll, usually 5+.

If the roll results in at least one success, the character has hit his target.

Deviation

If the roll on throwing shows no success, then the roll has failed. In this case, a roll is made on the deviation.

First, a W12 is thrown to determine the direction of the deviation. The result of the throw gives the direction in the form of the "clock" as seen by the throwing character facing the target. A 3 thus deviates to the right of the target, as seen by the throwing character.

Then a D6 is thrown, which determines the distance of the deviation in meters.

The thrown object thus lands at the determined location.